Financial problems – R43DSFRS http://r43dsfrs.com/ Fri, 23 Jul 2021 21:32:13 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://r43dsfrs.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1.png Financial problems – R43DSFRS http://r43dsfrs.com/ 32 32 Serial evictions in Tulsa County add to ongoing eviction crisis as CDC moratorium ends https://r43dsfrs.com/serial-evictions-in-tulsa-county-add-to-ongoing-eviction-crisis-as-cdc-moratorium-ends/ https://r43dsfrs.com/serial-evictions-in-tulsa-county-add-to-ongoing-eviction-crisis-as-cdc-moratorium-ends/#respond Fri, 23 Jul 2021 20:22:00 +0000 https://r43dsfrs.com/serial-evictions-in-tulsa-county-add-to-ongoing-eviction-crisis-as-cdc-moratorium-ends/ TULSA, Oklahoma. – Serial evictions continue to pose problems for tenants in Oklahoma, trapping low-income tenants in a vicious cycle of not only having to repay rent to stay in their accommodation, but other fees and expenses as well of justice. Legal experts describe it as a way for homeowners to raise more money, and […]]]>

TULSA, Oklahoma. – Serial evictions continue to pose problems for tenants in Oklahoma, trapping low-income tenants in a vicious cycle of not only having to repay rent to stay in their accommodation, but other fees and expenses as well of justice.

Legal experts describe it as a way for homeowners to raise more money, and this adds to the existing eviction crisis in Tulsa County. Eric Hallett, of Legal Aid of Oklahoma, said it was a form of financial abuse.

“This family’s credit is destroyed,” he said of the serial evictions. “This family can’t find another place to go.”

Property managers can use the courts to collect rent and late fees while passing legal fees on to tenants. In a Tulsa County case, a Cobblestone Apartments tenant faced 14 evictions dating back to 2019. All but one resulted in a default judgment. The tenant in this situation wished to remain anonymous for fear of another eviction.

“There is no protection against retaliation in Oklahoma,” Hallett said.

The Oklahoma Policy Institute has started a project called Open Justice Oklahoma, which tracks down the state’s most prolific serial evictors. Data revealed Cobblestone Apartments in Tulsa County topped the list, with 629 evictions filed from 2019 to 2020.

“Unfortunately, we have companies whose entire business model files dozens and dozens of evictions every month,” said Ryan Gentzler, of Open Justice Oklahoma.

Experts said the problem was mainly with business or out-of-state owners filing hundreds of evictions each year.

“The vast majority of evictions we see are not these Tulsa-based mom and pop owners receiving their retirement income; it’s these large corporations that are depositing the majority of those deposits by far,” Gentzler said.

Tenants with multiple evictions on their record are not good candidates when applying to live elsewhere; therefore, they have two options: become potentially homeless or stay put to repeat the cycle.

“Then what happens is if the water stops working, the owner says, ‘I don’t have to fix this. If you complain, I’ll just throw you out based on this court order I have against you. Hallett said

Serial evictions are legal, but there are some questions about Cobblestone’s cases against tenants during the eviction moratorium.

At the start of the pandemic, homeowners with federally guaranteed mortgages were not allowed to evict tenants. However, this has expired.

Clifton Adcock, a Frontier investigative reporter, found a gap in the apartment complex’s eviction files.

“The CDC statements that they file, basically the documents to show that they are complying with the moratorium on evictions and things like that, they actually say they don’t have a federally guaranteed mortgage. . However, I was able to find that indeed they do. ” said Adcock.

He said the county’s mortgage records showed the apartment complex received $ 10.7 million from Fannie Mae in October 2020.

“They are not filing new affidavits that reflect this,” Hallett said of the Cobblestone eviction cases. “What happened is that the eviction factory, the debt company that files these evictions against people, takes the old affidavit and adds a new cover page to it and files it with the court. . “

He said tenants rarely show up to court in eviction cases, which means if there is no false record, the eviction is still pending.

The Frontier contacted Cobblestone’s attorney, Nathan Milner, who said he was unaware Cobblestone had a federally guaranteed mortgage.

It is issues like these that fuel the confusion about the law and the protection tenants enjoy from evictions.

Ultimately, coming out of a cycle of serial expulsions is complex. To avoid this, tenants should always go to court if they wish to challenge their eviction before a judge.

2 News Oklahoma investigators, along with the Frontier, attempted to speak with the owners of Cobblestone; however, they did not respond.

WATCH the full story MONDAY 6:30 a.m. on 2 News Today.

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The financial stress of workers is increasing. Can Business Programs Help You? https://r43dsfrs.com/the-financial-stress-of-workers-is-increasing-can-business-programs-help-you/ https://r43dsfrs.com/the-financial-stress-of-workers-is-increasing-can-business-programs-help-you/#respond Wed, 21 Jul 2021 09:00:19 +0000 https://r43dsfrs.com/the-financial-stress-of-workers-is-increasing-can-business-programs-help-you/ Soni Kapoor wanted to stay ahead of his personal finances and retirement planning. As director of product marketing for Silicon Valley tech company Synopsys, Mr. Kapoor kept meticulous records of his expenses and investments in a personal spreadsheet. Last year, however, his company offered a new benefit that simplified his financial life: a “financial wellness” […]]]>

Soni Kapoor wanted to stay ahead of his personal finances and retirement planning. As director of product marketing for Silicon Valley tech company Synopsys, Mr. Kapoor kept meticulous records of his expenses and investments in a personal spreadsheet.

Last year, however, his company offered a new benefit that simplified his financial life: a “financial wellness” program, called Luminous Plan, which allows him to keep track of his finances in one place, from pension contributions to his health savings account balances. A dashboard feature gave him access to most of his accounts with just a few clicks.

“I have attached all of my financial accounts to the dashboard and I can do everything from budgeting to portfolio performance with one click,” said Mr Kapoor, 34. “I use it everyday.” Help with debt repayment or building a retirement portfolio can come from digital tools or from a professional – human advisor.

Employee financial stress is a major problem for American employers. According to a recent PwC study, 63 percent of American workers said their financial stress has increased since the start of the pandemic. More than half of respondents to PwC’s survey just before the pandemic said money was already a big constraint.

Large employers who have recognized some of these challenges, especially in areas like debt and retirement savings, have embraced and expanded financial wellness programs. A wide variety of companies, although usually the larger ones, like Delta Air Lines and SunTrust Banks, now offer such plans. Independent companies such as GO Plan101, Best money movements and Enrich build and manage well-being platforms.

More than half of companies surveyed in 2019 by the Employee Benefit Research Institute said they offer financial wellness initiatives to their employees. Another 20 percent were setting them up and 29 percent were interested in offering such programs.

A global benefits administrator, Alight Solutions, conducted a survey this year showing that about 80% of American workers have taken a specific action to better manage their money due to the pandemic, such as reducing debt or setting up a fund. emergency. This is where financial wellness programs can help.

“Last year has shown us how many people have had difficulty”, says Gretchen’s Day, vice-president of the AIA Alera Group, insurance consulting firm. “Many have had medical emergencies, student debt and caregiver issues with aging parents. Employers needed to think more holistically about these employee issues. “

The original goal of financial wellness programs was to help employees save more for retirement, primarily through company-sponsored 401 (k) plans. In recent years, however, plans have shifted from serving as a long-term savings vehicle to providing advice to employees on emergency savings and college debt, and even providing advance payments. paychecks in case of immediate need.

“Most wellness programs now offer solutions beyond advice and investment advice,” said Alison Borland, executive vice president at Alight Solutions. “They can help employees answer the questions: How much is your budget today, how much should you save for the future, and how can you prepare for the unexpected? “

If you have a wellness suite at work, what’s the best way to use it? Ann House, Director of University of Utah Financial Wellness Center, says the first step is to ask your human resources department what the benefits are and how they work. Then assess what you need most. Do you need advice on how to reduce your debt? Are you overspending and not saving enough for your retirement?

“Few adults have budgets,” said Ms. House, a certified financial advisor, whom she had found. “One of the foundations of financial well-being is knowing how much you need to live. It is a real revelation. “

While wellness plans offer nut soup tools for personal financial progress, there are areas where they may be insufficient. Employees may not want to share the fact that they are experiencing financial difficulties, even if the information is not shared with their employers. While it can be relatively easy to get employees to save more for their retirement through automatic 401 (k) enrollment, it is difficult to get them to reduce their expenses, especially when faced with a myriad of emergency expenses and impending debt.

“Employers recognize that personal finances are such a private matter, and many don’t feel comfortable asking employees to share details,” Ms. Day said.

Having third-party services separates these specific issues from the employer-employee relationship. Mr Kapoor, who was concerned about privacy before enrolling, said his “employer had no visibility into my personal finances.”

“It was my very first question before even creating their account,” he added.

During the pandemic, employees needing money drawn from their 401 (k) accounts, a move that can delay retirement if the money is not replaced. “A lot of used savings in the 401 (k) and the money didn’t come back into the plans,” Ms. Borland said. Three in 10 employees surveyed said they had withdrawn money from their 401 (k) or individual retirement accounts during the pandemic, mostly for medical bills and auto and home repairs. according to a recent poll.

Another potential downside of these programs for employees: Some of the more complex issues many employees face, such as paying child care and child care expenses and estate planning, go unanswered.

“There is not enough child care for working parents,” Ms. House said. Helping employees figure out how to pay for it “still isn’t covered in most wellness plans,” she added.

It is natural to have gaps with any digital platform when deploying it, no matter how well the data is collected and analyzed. Mr Kapoor found that even after consolidating his financial accounts, he had to manually reestablish the connection between his BrightPlan dashboard and certain bank accounts, “which is a minor inconvenience with some accounts,” he said.

Mr Kapoor said he would also like more personalized advice from his wellness platform to allow him “to easily estimate his best estate planning needs – why and why this or other life insurance. font is it right for you “.

While most wellness plans are paid for by employers, they aren’t completely free. Investment accounts for mutual funds and exchange traded funds and brokerage accounts usually have additional fees. The BrightPlan Managed Investment Account, for example, charges an annual fee of 0.25% of assets. Employees leaving the company can obtain BrightPlan services and pay for them out of pocket; the first three months are free, then $ 15 per month for the full suite and unlimited access to a financial advisor.

Despite all the new financial offerings, some parts of these programs are more popular with employees than others. In a measure of the success of employer defined contribution pension plans (the base offering of most wellness plans), half of employees polled by Alight said “investment performance” was most important to them, while only 24% said “risk management” exceeded their expectations. priority list. As in the rest of the world of retail financial education, conveying complex concepts such as risk / return tradeoffs, post-retirement income, the impact of investment costs and estate planning is an ongoing challenge. .

You may feel overwhelmed by the idea of ​​digging into your finances and you may not want to use your employer’s resources. If so, it may be helpful to use an independent, nonprofit source unrelated to your workplace. The Federal Council for Financial Consumer Protection offers a tool, which Ms. House recommends, which can help you identify what to do.

Your employer may not offer a financial wellness program, so take a DIY approach. Focus on your most pressing issues. If you need debt relief, consider the association National Consumer Credit Foundation, which offers a free online assessment and referrals to consulting agencies. Also consider a certified financial advisor. References can be found through the Association for Financial Advisory and Educational Planning.

Are you considering big college loans? Consider refinancing to reduce your monthly payments. Do you want to build up a retirement plan? Many online retirement planning calculators focus on expected longevity and savings, but for a more personalized approach you can also incur a fee only, certified financial planner, which does not work on commission but instead invoices a flat rate or a provision.

At the very least, take some honesty when creating your financial wellness plan. Are your finances hampering your ability to be productive? If so, get help. It never hurts to ask.


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State releases last school district from financial receivership https://r43dsfrs.com/state-releases-last-school-district-from-financial-receivership/ https://r43dsfrs.com/state-releases-last-school-district-from-financial-receivership/#respond Tue, 20 Jul 2021 21:05:38 +0000 https://r43dsfrs.com/state-releases-last-school-district-from-financial-receivership/ The state officially released the Muskegon Heights school district from receivership, marking the end of surveillance of all school districts and communities in the state. “Today is a new day for the Muskegon Heights School District and the State of Michigan,” Governor Whitmer said in A declaration posted on Monday. “The efforts of the school […]]]>

The state officially released the Muskegon Heights school district from receivership, marking the end of surveillance of all school districts and communities in the state.

“Today is a new day for the Muskegon Heights School District and the State of Michigan,” Governor Whitmer said in A declaration posted on Monday. “The efforts of the school district and the community to identify the problems and bring together the resources necessary to solve complex financial problems are to be commended. I am proud to say that we no longer have a school district or community under state watch. ”

Gov. Rick Snyder appointed an emergency manager to lead the Muskegon Heights district in 2012, after the school board asked the state to step in due to financial issues. The neighborhood later fully converted into a charter district, and outsourced operations to a private for-profit management company, which managed the district’s schools until 2014.

After reengineering into a self-governing charter district, schools in Muskegon Heights were able to stabilize declining enrollment and improve their finances. The district has not had an emergency manager since 2016, and no school or district has had an emergency manager since 2018. But the Muskegon Heights district has remained under state oversight through the Transitional Advisory Council for Guardianship.

This spring, the receivership board voted to dissolve it, saying the district’s financial situation had stabilized. Governor Gretchen Whitmer officially ended the receivership with the stroke of a pen on Monday.

“In reviewing the achievements of the Muskegon Heights School District, it has made significant progress under the statutory oversight of the Transitional Receivership Advisory Council (the Council),” the governor wrote in his letter dissolve the board of directors. “In addition, the financial conditions have been corrected in a sustainable manner. “

The state still has a “partnership agreement” through the Michigan Department of Education to provide assistance to the district. And the district will continue to submit monthly financial reports to the state.


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Mail Changes Affect Montana Letter Carriers | 406 Politics https://r43dsfrs.com/mail-changes-affect-montana-letter-carriers-406-politics/ https://r43dsfrs.com/mail-changes-affect-montana-letter-carriers-406-politics/#respond Tue, 20 Jul 2021 12:00:00 +0000 https://r43dsfrs.com/mail-changes-affect-montana-letter-carriers-406-politics/ The public responded by accusing Donald Trump’s fundraiser and postmaster Louis DeJoy of poking their noses into the postal service ahead of the general election. Then-Montana Gov. Steve Bullock sued DeJoy over the changes, citing mail delays and concerns about a fair election if the delivery of ballots by mail was not timely. Montana switched […]]]>

The public responded by accusing Donald Trump’s fundraiser and postmaster Louis DeJoy of poking their noses into the postal service ahead of the general election. Then-Montana Gov. Steve Bullock sued DeJoy over the changes, citing mail delays and concerns about a fair election if the delivery of ballots by mail was not timely. Montana switched almost completely to postal voting during the pandemic.

These policies were eventually scrapped after sparking public outrage not only over the late letters, but also the removal of curbside mail drop boxes, as well as mail sorting equipment from the facilities. postal. The drop boxes have been returned.

Montana postal workers gathered to protest.






Julie Quilliam holds a sign as a group of postal workers and members of the Carriers Union gather at West 24th Street and Central Avenue to protest against changes to the U.S. Postal Service in 2020.


CASEY PAGE, Billings Gazette


Earlier this year, DeJoy told the House Oversight Committee that the USPS struggled during the pandemic, like all organizations, often with too few people to deliver mail. The level of service provided by USPS has been deteriorating for years, DeJoy said, and has not started in 2020. USPS is supposed to be self-sustaining, which will require service changes and increased rates, he said. declared.

The proposed 10-year restructuring, intended to stem the USPS’s financial woes, comes as the state and nation’s postal service improves. The WestPac regional office has not reported any mail delays in and around Billings, for example. The government agency would not disclose delivery data for the state, calling the information a “trade secret” available only on request for public documents.


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4 ways regulators should keep up with the global digital economy https://r43dsfrs.com/4-ways-regulators-should-keep-up-with-the-global-digital-economy/ https://r43dsfrs.com/4-ways-regulators-should-keep-up-with-the-global-digital-economy/#respond Mon, 19 Jul 2021 09:33:16 +0000 https://r43dsfrs.com/4-ways-regulators-should-keep-up-with-the-global-digital-economy/ Governments must learn to regulate digital industries without stifling innovation. Today’s regulatory institutions are rooted in the 20th century and lack oversight broad enough to cope with the digital economy. In seeking to remedy this, governments should consider four different areas. Governments are grappling with the challenge of regulating new and rapidly expanding industries while […]]]>
  • Governments must learn to regulate digital industries without stifling innovation.
  • Today’s regulatory institutions are rooted in the 20th century and lack oversight broad enough to cope with the digital economy.
  • In seeking to remedy this, governments should consider four different areas.

Governments are grappling with the challenge of regulating new and rapidly expanding industries while guarding against potential risks since technological change first accompanied the Industrial Revolution. 18th and in the 19th century, governments had to support the development of entirely new industries while tackling problems in areas such as child labor, sanitation and air quality.

These challenges had to be met because of the dramatic economic and social effects of these industries. There were very clear advantages for the government in supporting their development, but also huge potential disadvantages in allowing the market to dictate the terms.

Governments today face a similar tightrope act in regulating the global digital economy forged by the Fourth Industrial Revolution. The public sector must enable businesses to develop new innovative digital products and services, while incorporating regulatory security measures against possible harm and clear guidelines within which businesses can operate safely.

The difference is that, this time, public institutions anchored in the 20e century and organized around the regulation of single industries must be modernized to keep pace with large companies increasingly spanning multiple sectors as part of the new digital economy. Consider financial services: Activities like buying and paying for goods on social media have both retail and financial services elements and are regulated by multiple organizations. As a result, new regulations continue to be rolled out, overseen by different agencies, to cover additional areas, creating a patchwork of regulators both nationally and internationally.

Even new cross-industry regulations often need to be broadened further in order to fairly cover all of the growing digital business. For example, the GDPR in Europe, a policy designed to protect consumers by protecting individual data, can make it difficult for start-ups and scale-ups to access the vast amounts of consumer data held by large companies. . Yet often large companies can still share data on their own platforms. This creates new competitive challenges, which are regulated by a different set of institutions.

So what can be done? To be effective, governments must rethink how they regulate the rapidly growing global digital economy, taking into account four new emerging and parallel digital challenges.

1. Scope

Over the past century, regulators have identified challenges within markets that have lent themselves to the development of regulatory agencies or bodies that deal with that specific market, such as energy or telecommunications. Or they focused on a specific challenge, like how to deal with monopoly power.

But in the digital economy, the biggest companies span everything from consumer goods and retail to telecommunications and energy. Regulators also need to be refocused on equally broad definitions of issues and markets.

For example, in the UK, the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) and the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) are cross-industry competition and data protection agencies that set standards across the economy. In a recent review of digital markets, the AMC recently began to redefine markets and market power.

In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission treats data protection as part of its broader consumer protection mandate and has experience with automated decision-making. He could take an even more holistic view of data protection and competition under his new chairmanship, who is a well-known figure in antitrust circles.

2. Climb

Regulators also need to find a way to deal with unprecedented financial firepower that gives big tech companies the opportunity to outflank them on many fronts. Some of the larger companies have annual budgets greater than the GDP of most countries. With digital services becoming an integral part of everything from how we buy to how we move to how our financial services are handled, the operations of large digital players are critically important to how businesses operate. national digital economies. As a result, some decision makers envision regulatory frameworks requiring operational resilience requirements.

In addition, many digital services are now spread across geographic boundaries. As a result, regulation in one area may not provide a complete solution in the absence of agreements between a wider range of nations and states. This is where supranational bodies play an important role in setting standards for national regulation and providing guidance on global issues such as cross-border data sharing.

There are precedents for international regulation of the financial services market, such as the Financial Stability Board, which oversees financial markets, coordinates financial authorities and sets international standards. The massive, international and cross-sectoral scale of digital markets will create new challenges and make international coordination difficult. Nonetheless, this is no reason to shy away from it, recognizing that it may need to take the form of regional rather than global coordination of like-minded nations in the short term.

3. Digital some products

The regulation of digital data relative to other products also needs to be rethought. There is an implicit assumption that physical products sold on a digital platform are covered by current regulatory regimes.

However, the current absence of an explicit cross-sector consumer protection body in any country exposes consumers to the digital exploitation of the rules under which products and services fall across sectors. For example, consumers may mistakenly assume that food sold by online retailers meets national safety standards. Another is that an unregulated “buy now, pay later” credit offer can look like a loan to a borrower, much like a credit card or bank overdraft. But while he can feel identical to a client, the protections offered differ.

Even when companies are subject to the same regulations, the reality of day-to-day surveillance is that digital activities are often not yet scrutinized in the same way and therefore not subject to the same intensity of surveillance.

4. Digital behaviour

Finally, regulation must be designed to respond to new forms of digital behavior. One of the biggest lessons from past regulatory reforms has been that people don’t always respond in the way that regulators expect. When the UK government, for example, began to significantly open up the electricity and gas markets, it was assumed that free markets would lead consumers to shop around and switch providers for a better deal.

These assumptions were based on standard economic assumptions about how consumers seek to maximize their own benefit. But it turned out that the vast majority of people stuck with the incumbent provider.

Digital regulatory approaches need to be built around a more sophisticated understanding of what people actually do with new digital products and services, rather than how we might expect them to behave – even though consumers themselves are not always aware of how their data is being used. and its extracted value.

A sustainable digital economy

Technological innovations are becoming more and more integrated into our daily lives, generating new and precious opportunities but also digital risks that are increasing exponentially. Genuinely protecting consumers, while encouraging further technological advancement, will require a more modern and holistic regulatory architecture on the part of governments.

As a starting point, policymakers can begin to reconcile digital tussles between regulatory agencies by creating regulatory colleges and cooperative forums that help provide solutions to some of the cross-sectoral challenges that the new digital economy poses. . This is starting to happen, for example through the Digital Regulation Cooperation Forum in the UK, which seeks to understand where coordination points are needed and address them head-on.

What is the World Economic Forum doing on digital trade?

The Fourth Industrial Revolution – driven by rapid technological change and digitization – has already had a profound impact on global trade, economic growth and social progress. Cross-border e-commerce has generated billions of dollars in economic activity continuing to accelerate and the ability for data to cross borders underpins new business models, increasing global GDP by 10% in the past decade alone. .


The application of emerging technologies in trade aims to increase efficiency and inclusiveness in global trade by enabling more small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to repeat its advantages and by closing the economic gap between developed countries and developing countries.

However, digital trade barriers, including outdated regulations and fragmented governance of emerging technologies, could potentially hamper these gains. We lead the charge of applying 4IR technologies to make international trade more inclusive and efficient, ranging from enabling e-commerce and digital payments to designing trade standards and policies around emerging technologies (“TradeTech”) .

But what we really need is a new surveillance architecture tailored to the needs of the digital economy age. Such a regulatory architecture for the digital economy should bring together and comprehensively address new emerging cross-sector risks in terms of scope, scale, products and behavior.


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The pandemic tightens the noose on retirement https://r43dsfrs.com/the-pandemic-tightens-the-noose-on-retirement/ https://r43dsfrs.com/the-pandemic-tightens-the-noose-on-retirement/#respond Mon, 19 Jul 2021 00:21:17 +0000 https://r43dsfrs.com/the-pandemic-tightens-the-noose-on-retirement/ THE large-scale Covid-19 pandemic has inflicted economic and social wounds on lives, livelihoods, businesses as well as investments. Restrictive measures introduced in Malaysia to contain the spread of the virus have intensified the financial pressure on retirees not only now but also in the future. Coupled with the increase in life expectancy and the increasing […]]]>

THE large-scale Covid-19 pandemic has inflicted economic and social wounds on lives, livelihoods, businesses as well as investments.

Restrictive measures introduced in Malaysia to contain the spread of the virus have intensified the financial pressure on retirees not only now but also in the future.

Coupled with the increase in life expectancy and the increasing pressure on public resources to support health as well as the increase in the aging of the population, the risk that this pandemic will aggravate the precariousness of pensions is real.

Like many other countries, Malaysians are drawing heavily on their retirement savings to weather this pandemic crisis. This is in part due to the government’s policy of easing conditions, allowing Malaysians to withdraw their contributions to the Employee Provident Fund (EPF), the country’s largest pension fund, to ease their financial distress.

Such policy easing resulted in accelerated withdrawals which left 6.3 million contributors or 42% of the total of 15 million EPF members who would have less than RM 10,000 on account 1, while 9 , 3 million should have less than RM 10,000 on account 2.

Assuming basic savings of around RM 240,000 based on the retirement age of 55 or 60, and a relatively long retirement period of 15 to 20 years with an average life expectancy of 75 years, the The current depletion of savings certainly poses serious challenges.

Our retirees could use their retirement funds to help repay loans for fear of defaults, which could result in a “black mark” in CCRIS and CTOS files. This in turn could pose problems in the future, especially if they plan to seek new funding from banks. By using such withdrawals to stay afloat, many will end up with a paltry sum when they retire, jeopardizing their potential long-term returns.

The economic recession caused by the global health crisis has resulted in reduced pension contributions, lower investment returns and increased public debt. Inevitably, this will impact future retirements which might see some people working longer with others having a lower standard of living in retirement. The global pandemic has made retirement even more difficult.

Antoine Dass

But this problem cannot be attributed to the Covid-19 crisis alone. It was brewing even before this pandemic.

In fact, many public and private pension systems around the world were already under increasing pressure to maintain benefits before this pandemic. The Covid-19 pandemic has only worsened Malaysia’s pension crisis.

Before the pandemic, more than two-thirds (68%) of Malaysians aged 55 and under had savings of less than RM50,000. And this group could probably last around 4.5 years based on the poverty line of RM 930 per month. What about those with savings of less than RM7,000? What about informal and other sectors that are not covered by the pension fund?

Malaysians’ low financial literacy is believed to be one of the main reasons for low savings of around 36% compared to countries like Singapore at 59% and Myanmar at 52%. This lack of financial literacy could leave the next generation of retirees considerably poorer and sicker (due to not having enough savings to afford proper health care). This creates the risk that a “lost generation” of older people retire in poor health and without enough money to support themselves in retirement.

The opinion is that whether or not there is a Covid-19 pandemic, the risk of a retirement crisis persists. The pandemic has only raised fears that the next crisis will be a “pension crisis”.

This means the time has come for the government to seriously embark on a structural overhaul of how Malaysians can prepare for retirement, whether in the formal, informal or casual sectors. It is essential that the government recognizes the strengths and weaknesses of the current system and strives to ensure better long-term outcomes for retirees.

And it’s important to recognize that there is no one model pension system that will work for all countries. Malaysia urgently needs to design a practical retirement plan suitable for citizens of all segments. We need to get and study comparative information on different pension plans around the world to see what is possible and practical for us.

It is important to note that the coronavirus crisis has caused more than half of people in their 50s and 60s to experience a worsening of their financial situation. In addition, the closures had serious consequences for their physical and mental health. This could continue if this generation continues to be an afterthought in recovering from the coronavirus.

Malaysia will likely see a lost generation retire in poorer health and worse financial circumstances than previous ones. They are likely to face less than comfortable retirement years ahead. This could cause problems for the Malaysian economy and society, both structurally and individually. This will put more pressure on our high ratio of household debt to gross domestic product (GDP), which is around 93% in 2020. This is of great concern.

Efforts to tackle this problem need to be swift and coordinated across multiple parties to ensure effectiveness and policy coherence. Our financial and financial markets should focus on developing an ecosystem for fintech products and applying digital technology in addition to focusing on improving financial literacy and personal finance management and planning . Equally important, the government and its partners must take urgent action in two key areas.

First, they need to develop a “granular” view of those who need help keeping their jobs or finding a new job.

States, with the help of local councils, will be able to quickly develop a granular view of areas where jobs are at risk and areas where there is additional demand for labor by industry, occupation, demography and geography. .

Particular attention should be paid to small businesses and the most vulnerable workers, including those in the odd-job economy, as well as the informal and casual sectors.

In addition, the government must develop smart and cross-sectoral solutions with the aim of quickly obtaining support to help those affected. As it prepares to reopen the economy after the lockdown, it must find ways to maximize employment and protect itself against new infections, following standard operating procedures guidelines. Again, special emphasis will be needed to restart and support small businesses, which account for the majority of jobs in Malaysia.

At the same time, governments and businesses will need to create new mechanisms to help people whose jobs are at risk to redeploy to occupations in which the demand for labor still exceeds supply, and to expand rapidly. the skills needed for their new roles.

All will not be catastrophic if the population manages to bounce back from this health and economic crisis, just as investors did after past recessions. But unlike investors, it remains unclear whether the brutal spikes of slow wage growth and unemployment brought on by the pandemic could put additional strain on the system’s finances. It is important to look at where people are today compared to previous years.

Anthony Dass is the group’s chief economist and director of AmBank Research. He is a member of the Secretariat of the Economic Action Council; and Assistant Professor at UNE, Australia. The opinions expressed here are those of the author.


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Delhi pvt schools burn hole in parents pocket amid Covid https://r43dsfrs.com/delhi-pvt-schools-burn-hole-in-parents-pocket-amid-covid/ https://r43dsfrs.com/delhi-pvt-schools-burn-hole-in-parents-pocket-amid-covid/#respond Sun, 18 Jul 2021 09:25:00 +0000 https://r43dsfrs.com/delhi-pvt-schools-burn-hole-in-parents-pocket-amid-covid/ NEW DELHI: Billing exorbitant fees by private schools has become a major contentious issue for thousands of parents across the nation’s capital during the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic. Hundreds of parents, who have been financially affected because of Covid-19, have interrupted their children’s education in private schools after private schools took strict action against those who […]]]>
NEW DELHI: Billing exorbitant fees by private schools has become a major contentious issue for thousands of parents across the nation’s capital during the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic.

Hundreds of parents, who have been financially affected because of Covid-19, have interrupted their children’s education in private schools after private schools took strict action against those who could not file their fees.

All India Parents Association national president Ashok Agarwal told IANS that all such parents should consider transferring their children from private schools without assistance to public schools in Delhi so that they do not have to pay high fees.

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At such a time, the government should not refuse admission to such a student on the basis of a particular reason. Quality education must also be ensured through the appropriate recruitment of teachers.

Poonam Kochitty, principal of the Seth Anandram Jaipuria school, says her school is following required government instructions. However, parents who have financial problems benefit from a reduction in fees. Parents can now pay the fees in monthly mode. On special request, parents facing financial problems can also make a late payment of tuition fees.

On paying tuition fees during the Covid-19 pandemic, Heritage Xperiential Learning School says: “Although most of the parents of children studying at our school have paid the tuition, Covid-19 has posed challenges. to many parents. lower fees for parents facing financial difficulties. ”

At the same time, the Delhi government has decided that students studying in private schools in Delhi, who now wish to leave private schools and enroll in public schools, will no longer need to pass transfer certificates. . These students will be admitted to Delhi public schools without presenting a transfer certificate. The heads of the education department will take the transfer certificates of these students from the private schools of their level.

Delhi Deputy Chief Minister Manish Sisodia, who is also Minister of Education, said that due to Covid-19, several people have lost their jobs. In such a situation, many parents cannot afford the exorbitant fees charged by private schools and enroll their children in public schools. However, many private schools require arrears based on tuition fees increased over the past year.

In the event of non-payment of this amount, the transfer certificate is not issued by private schools to children. Therefore, the Delhi government has provided this assistance to students in the event of TC, he said.

The daughter of Kiran Pathak, a parent from Delhi, studies in class 7. According to her, the new school decrees that have come out in recent days have increased the parents’ troubles. Many private schools now not only charge increased tuition fees, but also demand increased tuition fees in the past year.

According to Kiran, if the situation persists, she will have no choice but to send her daughter to a public school by getting her out of private school.

Manish Sisodia said the Delhi government strongly defends students and parents in court against rising fees for private schools. The AAP government is asking parents that if they wish, they can enroll their children in Delhi public schools.


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Disney might have solved 2 problems in 1 move https://r43dsfrs.com/disney-might-have-solved-2-problems-in-1-move/ https://r43dsfrs.com/disney-might-have-solved-2-problems-in-1-move/#respond Sat, 17 Jul 2021 12:10:00 +0000 https://r43dsfrs.com/disney-might-have-solved-2-problems-in-1-move/ Walt disney (NYSE: DIS) has welcomed more and more guests to its theme parks after the coronavirus pandemic forced the company to temporarily close doors to visitors at various times over the past 18 months. These closures have cost the company billions in lost revenue. As it tries to pull itself together financially, Disney is […]]]>

Walt disney (NYSE: DIS) has welcomed more and more guests to its theme parks after the coronavirus pandemic forced the company to temporarily close doors to visitors at various times over the past 18 months. These closures have cost the company billions in lost revenue.

As it tries to pull itself together financially, Disney is testing a new feature in its theme park in Paris. The company allows customers to purchase premium access passes that would allow them to skip the lines altogether. People can buy premium access to a ride they want to take at a specific time slot without waiting in the long queue. The move has the potential to solve two problems simultaneously.

Image source: Getty images.

1. Increase income to pre-pandemic levels

Priced between 8 and 15 euros per trip per guest, the skip-the-line pass could significantly increase the park’s revenue. It’s similar to the free Fast Pass feature that was available at Disney Parks before the pandemic, but it’s more convenient in that the paid version lets the user choose any time slot they want. People who use it regularly could easily spend more on Premier passes than on the price of admission. And excluding the cost of the technology to develop the capacity, the revenue from these passes will fall almost entirely into the bottom line.

If the program is successful in Paris, Disney could extend the functionality to the rest of its theme parks. This could play an important role in returning income to pre-pandemic levels. In fiscal 2020 alone, the segment which includes theme parks, experiences and products recorded a 37% decrease in revenue compared to the previous year.

The loss in revenue led to a sharp decline in segment operating income, from $ 6.7 billion in 2019 to a loss of $ 81 million in 2020.

2. Reduce complaints of long wait times

One of the most common complaints from guests visiting a Disney theme park is the long wait time to see attractions. Before the pandemic, it was getting harder and harder to find a time of day or day of the year when Disney theme parks weren’t filled to capacity. It was common to wait over an hour to access the most popular rides.

By offering a premium pass that allows customers to skip the lines altogether, Disney can reduce complaints of long wait times. If the program works as intended, customers who really want to experience an attraction without queuing can pay for the privilege (some restrictions still apply). This can serve as accountability for frustrated customers, who can now pay to improve their experience.

Not without risks

However, the move is not without risk. This could alienate repeat customers who are unwilling or unable to pay for premium access and may have to wait longer for rides. Or the demand can be so high for premium passes on some rides that not everyone who wants to buy one can. This may improve the experience for a few guests but make it worse for others and doesn’t really solve the overall problem.

It is therefore prudent for management to test the functionality in only one of its theme parks before rolling it out to the others. Hopefully this can resolve any issues that arise and determine whether the net effects of the feature are worth deploying.

The company continues its momentum, trying to maximize customer spending at theme parks. Experimenting with entry prices, annual passes, and features like premium passes will go a long way towards achieving the goal. Investors can rest assured that the parks will likely attract visitors for decades to come.

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In Clarksburg, water isn’t coming out of the faucet. Fixing the problem is expensive, and nobody’s getting paid. | News https://r43dsfrs.com/in-clarksburg-water-isnt-coming-out-of-the-faucet-fixing-the-problem-is-expensive-and-nobodys-getting-paid-news/ https://r43dsfrs.com/in-clarksburg-water-isnt-coming-out-of-the-faucet-fixing-the-problem-is-expensive-and-nobodys-getting-paid-news/#respond Sat, 17 Jul 2021 04:23:35 +0000 https://r43dsfrs.com/?p=415 Here’s what you need to know: Faucets in Berkshire County’s smallest water district sometimes just stop flowing. The volunteers who run the Briggsville Water District in Clarksburg know what’s wrong — but can’t yet afford the full fix, despite mandates from the state DEP. The district gets scant outside help, but plenty of reminders from the […]]]>

CLARKSBURG — Every week through the winter, water stopped coming out of the faucets at John Barnes’ house.

Each time, he grabbed two buckets and trudged to the side of a nearby hill, where water spilled from overflow pipes located just below the spring and storage tanks that supply the Briggsville Water District.

The water would typically come back on a day or two later, in the middle of the night. When the house rattled, Barnes knew he could shower again — and prepare for the next outage.

“The system is crumbling from within,” he said. “And they don’t have the revenue or resources to fix the problem.”

For more than five years, Barnes and his neighbors in Clarksburg have complained of frequent water outages from the tiny water district, which supplies water to buildings along the Hoosic River in one of the most densely settled parts of a quiet town.

Several years ago, the state began to hand down mandates. Residents elected a new board of water commissioners. And those commissioners set about trying to fix the problem. And yet, the outages continue.

As the federal government prepares to put more than $1 trillion into the country’s aging infrastructure, the volunteer stewards of this district are trying to repair major problems with their water infrastructure on a shoestring budget, with no one to rely on but themselves.

And they are inching closer to a solution to their water headaches — and trying to pass along a better infrastructure to future generations.






A building above the spring water spouts

The Briggsville Water District is the county’s smallest drinking water system, according to a Berkshire Regional Planning Commission survey. Most residents in the town of Clarksburg get water from North Adams or their own wells.



The Briggsville Water District

If you look at the Briggsville Water District on a vertical scale, Barnes lives near the top. That’s bad for him because the district is fed by gravity. The water starts at the Red Mill Spring, flows into a concrete storage tank near 494 River Road and travels downhill along the road.

The district serves about 180 people through 63 connections, according to the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection. It is the Berkshires’ smallest drinking water system by population served, according to a 2014 Berkshire Regional Planning Commission study. Most people in Clarksburg rely instead on wells or water from the city of North Adams.






Diagram of gravity-fed water system

According to experts and local officials, the district’s gravity-based system is the crux of the issue.

As water flows downhill, it can escape through leaks in decades-old lateral pipes, the lines that carry water from the main to each house. That makes the pressure in the system drop, a problem compounded at certain times of the day when people are most likely to shower, clean their dishes and run their washing machines.

Consumers need a certain amount of pressure to get water flowing up their own lateral pipes — and the higher they are in the system, the more pressure they need. Without that necessary pressure, the residents closest to the spring find themselves with no water coming out of the faucets.

That is what happened over the winter, when a leak near Town Hall persisted for months, intermittently cutting off the water for Barnes and some of his neighbors.

According to DEP documents provided to The Eagle, complaints of periodic water shortages began as early as 2015. At the time, the district told the DEP that the shortages were a result of “frozen water lines, water leaks, customers filling swimming pools, and faulty equipment.”

By 2016, the outages were occurring regularly, according to a survey of local water districts published by the Massachusetts Office of the State Auditor.

The entry for Clarksburg read: “Residents on the east side of Town, run by a co-op are experiencing frequent water outages, and capacity problems. There needs to be significant investments in water line replacements that neither the Town nor Co-op has.”

The ‘redheaded stepchild’






Carl McKinney in front of a house

Above left: Carl McKinney, of Clarksburg, has become one of the people responsible for the fate of the tiny Briggsville Water District. He lives at the top of a gravity-fed water system, so, when leaks plague the whole system, his water also goes out. Above right: The overflow for the drinking water supply for some residents of River Road in Clarksburg. This house, which is adjacent to the spring, will be razed to accommodate water holding tanks. On facing page: The north branch of the Hoosic River goes under Route 8A in Clarksburg.



At Carl McKinney’s house, just up River Road from Barnes, the water tends to go off in the mornings — when there is a big leak in the system.

“That’s the puzzling thing,” he said. “It’s almost like clockwork, at 6:30 in the morning.”

McKinney, a former Clarksburg town administrator, serves as chairman of the board of water commissioners. The district also has an operator and an accountant. All of them, except the accountant, are volunteers, according to McKinney. All inherited the problem.

“People want government to fix things?” he said. “Government is a collection of us. We are the government.”

The people who set up the district? “They’re all dead,” McKinney said.

Local residents formed the Briggsville Water District in 1980 to replace an existing water system, which had been created so locals would not have to rely on shallow wells but which had started to degrade.

They named the new district after the section of the town, which McKinney says refers to the Briggs brothers, who owned and operated a mill by the river.

A few years in, district leaders replaced the system’s main line. Then, very little happened. The district became what McKinney calls the town’s “redheaded stepchild.”

“The district kind of floated along,” McKinney said. “The people died off. And nobody replaced them. So, we’re trying to put everything back together.”

By 2016, the DEP had stepped in with mandates: The district should install a water meter, clarify its leadership, remove a booster pump that was not permitted, and fulfill a half-dozen other requirements.

At the time, McKinney was town administrator. The district wanted the Select Board to take over, and the board did so temporarily. But, board members quickly decided to shed that duty, since the 1980 act establishing the entity mandated that commissioners belong to the district.

After a sparsely attended meeting in 2019, the district once again had an independent board, which included Deborah Lapine and Mary Giron. They put in a water meter and began to check off DEP boxes. But, the leaks continued.

The leaks

By U.S. standards, the district’s main line is relatively young, a spry three decades and change.

“The problem is, when they put in the main, all of the lateral lines — the lines from the main line to the dwelling or the business — were not replaced,” McKinney said. “So, that’s where, historically, the leaks have been.”

The district has plenty of water. The problem is that water rushes through the system and escapes through leaks in lateral pipes, some of which date to World War II.

“In the lower side, when you have a breakdown there, it drains the whole darn system,” McKinney said.

Property owners are responsible for their own pipes, and the district has few shut-offs, which means one leak can affect many people. To fix leaks, the district has to find them. That job falls to Clebe Scott.

When the town turned its attention to the water problem a few years ago, officials discovered that Scott was the only person still working to keep the district running.

For decades, the Clarksburg resident had been operating the water system, keeping his certifications up to date, testing for chemicals and repairing leaks — all as a volunteer.

He first got roped in when a neighbor, George Carson, asked for help.

Carson was creating the district and needed to put down a water operator’s name. Scott had his water operator’s license because he needed it for his job with the state park system. So, Carson asked if he could make Scott the operator, “just on paper,” Scott recalls — and recruit him for manual labor.

“I was younger than him, so, I think he liked the way I dug a hole,” Scott said.

In the 1990s, Carson died. That is when Scott started getting the calls, and they never stopped. Now, it was his responsibility to keep the water running: for his family, for himself and for his neighbors.

He soon discovered that it was a thankless task.

“No one wants anything to do with the water until there’s a problem,” he said. “People always stop and say, ‘Oh, jeez, got a leak.’ And, yeah, give me a call if I can help. But, you know, people don’t want to serve on boards, or have anything to do with anything until they’re affected.”

And once the problem is gone, he said, so is the attention.

“I appreciate everyone’s good wishes and all that,” he said. “But, good wishes don’t do the dishes.”

The water stethoscope

Scott says massive leaks in the system spring up only once a year or so. Some of them are obvious, like when water bubbles up into someone’s yard. Others require detective work: Scott uses a tool that detects the murmur of water flowing below ground.

“It’s like a stethoscope,” Scott said. “A listening device. These metal disks lay flat on the ground, and you listen. If there’s a fair leak, and you’ve got hard pavement, you may hear it.”

Scott finds leaks by trying to figure out where water is running when it should not be: the middle of the night. He lies down on side streets and listens to the lateral pipes.

“If you can hear water still moving, if nobody’s awake, there’s a good chance the leak is down there,” he said.

Big leaks can be all-consuming. Scott spent most of the coronavirus pandemic winter tracking down the leak near the Town Hall. On top of that, his routine responsibilities grow each year, with more forms to fill out from the state, more testing requirements to hit, more demands piled on top of a one-man operation.

“I’m not the only guy out there doing this sort of thing,” he said. “Across the rural water system landscape, there are many people that are like this. The people I talk to are totally dedicated to their systems.”

The infrastructure problem






Graphic comparing tank storage capacity

Across the country, 50,000 drinking water systems serve 20 percent of the U.S. population, according to Casey Brown, professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. Most of those systems, though not as small as Briggsville, are minuscule, serving just a few thousand people. And finding the money to make upgrades? Not easy, outside of big municipalities.

“Water utilities face a trillion dollars of construction and replacement costs to maintain their systems,” Brown said. “The little towns are just going to defer maintenance. And you’ll have systems like this that are leaking water and not very reliable.”

Regulatory demands, like the ones handed down to Briggsville from the state, can pose major challenges. In a 2017 report, the state estimated that local water systems across the commonwealth require improvements totaling $17 billion.

As the DEP probed the Briggsville district over several years, it continued to add mandates. The biggest one: put in a two-day water supply.

The system can store just 2,700 gallons, McKinney says. Customers use 14,000 gallons of water on a typical day. That means the district needs to increase capacity tenfold to create the necessary supply.

Beside the district’s storage tank sits a single family home, at 494 River Road. When McKinney’s children were growing up, he says, they played with kids who lived in that house. But, the family long had since left, and the house had fallen into disrepair. People had started dumping mattresses and toys in the yard.






A house on River Road

Junk often accumulates outside the house at 494 River Road as the untended yard fills with toys and mattresses. The Briggsville Water District has plans to tear down the house to make room for a water-storage supply, but the process has been slow-moving.



It was the perfect place, McKinney realized, to put a water tank. When the house went up for auction in 2019, he represented the water district, bid and won.

That was only the beginning. To tear down the house, they would have to get hazardous materials out of it. Finding a contractor was nearly impossible, McKinney said — few companies wanted to bear the cost of hauling equipment to Clarksburg, nearly as far from Boston as you can get.

“You get one or two bids, if you’re lucky,” he said. “Then you have to make a decision on whether you’re going to blow this kind of money.”

The coronavirus pandemic hit just as they kicked off the search, and the effort slowed to a crawl. The garage of the abandoned house briefly served as the commissioners’ meeting place during the winter. They gathered, spaced out, with the door open.

“It’s not easy to write with gloves on,” McKinney said.

They also tried Zoom meetings, though McKinney does not have a camera on his home computer and still runs Windows 7, almost a decade out of date.

Still, they made progress. This year, they accepted a $19,000 bid to remove hazardous materials. That means tapping into the district’s savings. The district operates on an annual budget of $18,000.

After they get the house down and a storage tank in its place, the commissioners want to hire a firm that can take over Scott’s job. They already tried to find a water operator: McKinney sent letters to everyone with water operator licenses within 50 miles and not a single person with the right credentials was interested. The final step will be adding more shut-offs, McKinney says, to stop leaks from draining the system.

The district gathers for its annual meeting at the end of July, when McKinney thinks rates may rise again. They’ve shot up in recent years as the district eyes expensive fixes. At the meeting, McKinney also plans to put his name in the hat to serve the district for at least one more year. But, as he searches for a new job, he knows work could take him out of the town.

Before the district no longer is his responsibility, he wants to leave behind order. The system is in a good place right now — no major leaks for months, McKinney says. But, the town needs stability, he thinks, a way to keep the district rolling along, delivering what he describes as “the best water around.” If he leaves, he hopes more people step up to fill his shoes.

He worries about the district, just as he worries about the town’s bridges and roads, about flooding, about whether the infrastructure bill finally will pass Congress and whether a surge of projects might make it impossible for small towns to afford contractors.

It is not clear whether any of the federal government’s proposed funding for wastewater, stormwater and drinking water infrastructure upgrades might be able to help, but McKinney holds out the hope that the district can secure state money to finish the job. For now, though, they are on their own.

“[My generation] inherited a pretty good infrastructure,” he said. “My grandparents and parents, they built a pretty good infrastructure. Now, we’ve run it into the ground.”


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Tarigami urges addressing concerns of DD artists https://r43dsfrs.com/tarigami-urges-addressing-concerns-of-dd-artists/ https://r43dsfrs.com/tarigami-urges-addressing-concerns-of-dd-artists/#respond Fri, 16 Jul 2021 19:35:13 +0000 https://r43dsfrs.com/tarigami-urges-addressing-concerns-of-dd-artists/ Tarigami urges addressing concerns of DD artists Posted on Jul 17, 2021 | Author RK News Srinagar, July 16: Expressing his anguish at the deplorable economic conditions of local Doordarshan artists, CPI (M) leader Mohammad Yousuf Tarigami urged the government to immediately come to the rescue of these important members of society and resolve their […]]]>


Tarigami urges addressing concerns of DD artists

Posted on Jul 17, 2021 | Author RK News

Srinagar, July 16: Expressing his anguish at the deplorable economic conditions of local Doordarshan artists, CPI (M) leader Mohammad Yousuf Tarigami urged the government to immediately come to the rescue of these important members of society and resolve their livelihood issues.

In a statement released Friday, Tarigami said many local artists, who were associated with Doordarshan’s Kashir Channel, have been without any means of subsistence since 2013 after authorities halted production of new content for the channel.

Claiming that these artists, including independent producers, directors, actors, singers and others who have been productions and affiliated with Kashir Channel for decades, have been left dry because Prasar Bharti does not produce new programs Kashmiris, he aims at this channel when it does not allow productions in Kashmir?

“There are hundreds of artists whose families depended solely on the production work of Kashir Channel. All these years they have managed to support their families with savings which are now depleted and they have no other source of income, ”he said, asking the LG administration to take immediate action and to save artists from starvation.

In other parts of the country, states have developed policies and guidelines to help local talent. Unfortunately, in Kashmir, the SD authorities have developed policies aimed at keeping local talent away from employment opportunities. The authorities of DD and Prasar Bharati must look into the matter and ensure that local talents are not only encouraged, but that their financial problems are also addressed as a priority, he said.

Referring to the Information and Public Relations Department having announced the hiring of producers for the production of films on various subjects, Tarigami said it is unfortunate that local talent appears to have been excluded from the qualifying parameters. “Instead of focusing on the creative credibility and experience of individuals or production units in the field, the new guidelines appear to focus on the financial strength of the candidate, which may result in the ousting of creators from J&K.” , he lamented.

Urging the LG to intervene personally in this serious problem, the CPI (M) wanted the head of government to do justice to these artists.


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